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Linder and Fodor Out Front after First Day of U.S. Dressage Festival of Champions

By Dana Rossmeier, US Equestrian Communications Department

Wayne, IL – Combinations competing for the AGCO/USEF Junior Dressage National Championship and USEF Children Dressage National Championship got their first shot in the ring on Friday to open the U.S. Dressage Festival of Champions. The judges saw a promising group of athletes in both divisions demonstrate their early potential with close scores across the board. Isabel Linder and Elvis have a narrow lead in the junior division with a score of 70.991%. Abby Fodor and Slip and Slide hold the top spot in the children’s division with a score of 67.889%. Today’s tests counted 50% towards their overall scores.

AGCO/USEF Junior Dressage National Championship

Fresh off their individual freestyle bronze medal at the 2017 Adequan®/FEI North American Junior and Young Rider Championships presented by Gotham North (NAJYRC), Linder (Kewadin, Mich.) and Elvis looked strong in their debut at Lamplight, following the FEI Junior Team Test, to lead the AGCO/USEF Junior Dressage National Championship. She and the 13-year-old Westphalian gelding owned by Hai Wei continue to evolve in dressage following his career as a jumper. Watch Linder’s winning ride here.

“I thought my test went really well today. Elvis listened to everything I asked, but we need to work on more collection,” said Linder. “It has been awesome competing against people my age and meeting people, not just my age, but also others who share in the same interest.”

Meredith Talley (Nicholasville, Ky.) saw improvement with her horse Romeo in their second-place performance. She and the 10-year-old

Danish Warmblood gelding are coming off their second year at NAJYRC and got into a smooth rhythm to earn a score of 68.964%, just barely off the lead.

“We had a lot of fun in our test today. He was very comfortable to ride, and I felt comfortable pushing him a little more today. I am so proud of him. The biggest weakness right now is the trot, but overall we have been doing a lot better,” said Talley.

The 2016 Region 3 NAJYRC team gold medalists Juliet Hess and Diano rode a smooth test to place third. She and the 14-year-old Belgian Warmblood gelding owned by Julia Stainback earned a score of 68.509% going into Saturday’s FEI Junior Individual Test.

Complete Results

USEF Children Dressage National Championship

Fodor (Bloomsbury, N.J.) exceeded her own expectations winning the FEI Children Team Test. She and Marie Fodor’s Slip and Slide entered the ring last but lept to the top of the pack with outstanding trot and canter work. The 14-year-old Quarter Horse/Haflinger gelding performed on point to guide Fodor to the victory gallop. Watch Fodor’s winning ride here.

“I was happy with today’s ride. The simple changes went well, but I was not expecting to win. I am grateful to be here. It’s really good that they decided to bring this division [to Lamplight],” said an emotional Fodor following her win.

Beatrix Leffingwell (Lake Villa, Ill.) and Luke Skywalker put in a nice test full of great simple changes to place second with a score of 66.389%.

Leffingwell and the 17-year-old Hanoverian mare recovered from an early mistake, but made up for it later in the test with the simple changes and trot work to remain in contention for the title.

“It’s an honor to be here and that they came up with this division because it’s hard competing against young riders and juniors when they are a lot older, said Leffingwell. “It’s special to be able to compete against people my age.”

Ellanor Boehning (Battle Ground, Ind.) and Kabam, Ann and Ellanor Boehning’s 14-year-old German Riding Pony gelding, placed third with a score of 66.056%. The 11 combinations will conclude the division on Saturday with the FEI Children Individual Test.

Complete Results

Find out more information about the U.S. Dressage Festival of Champions online.

The U.S. Dressage Festival of Champions will continue on Saturday with the first tests of the USEF Pony Rider Dressage National Championship and AGCO/USEF Young Rider Dressage National Championship as well as the conclusion of the AGCO/USEF Junior Dressage National Championship and the USEF Children Dressage National Championship. USEF Network will live stream all competition beginning at 8:00 a.m. EST. The live stream is only available to US Equestrian members; however, a special promotional code for viewing will be available.

Follow us on Facebook (@USADressage and @USEFNetwork), Instagram (@USEFNetwork), and Twitter (@USEFNetwork) for all the latest from the ring and behind the scenes.

Banner Photo: SusanJStickle.com
Photos: SusanJStickle.com: From top to bottom, Isabel Linder and Elvis, Meredith Talley and Romeo, Abby Fodor and Slip and Slide, and Beatrix Leffingwell and Luke Skywalker.

Pop Princess: Zenanta and Amy Speck-Kern Victorious in I1 Freestyle Debut

 

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Amy Speck-Kern and Zenanta in their I1 Freestyle (Photo courtesy of Jonna Jodko)

Wellington, FL (July 14, 2018) – A sweltering Florida summer couldn’t stop Excel Dressage’s Amy Speck-Kern and her X-year-old KWPN mare Zenanta from attaining another milestone in their dressage career. During June’s Gold Coast Summer Solstice, held at the Palm Beach Equine Sports Complex in Wellington, Florida, Speck-Kern and the elegant bay mare topped their debut FEI Freestyle class with a 72.230%. Zenanta (Krack C x Ferro) made her Intermediare I debut only in beginning of 2018, and her debut Intermediare I freestyle victory demonstrates the alacrity with which she is successfully progressing up the levels. The pair danced to a selection of violin covers of pop music from Avicii, Kygo, Lindsay Sterling, Justin Beiber, and Selena Gomez, all choreographed to the movements of the Intermediare I. Winning their first freestyle is a meaningful step as the mare continues to make progress towards the Grand Prix, and Speck-Kern also has her sights set on possibly taking Zenanta to regionals to do the Prix St. Georges, Intermediare I, and Intermediare I Freestyle.

The pair’s freestyle was designed by Karen Robinson of Applause Dressage. Beginning with a tribute to the late Avicii in the opening canter song, Gonna Love Ya, the test progressed to a Martin Z cover of Feel It Still by Portugal. The Man for Zenanta’s trot, a Lindsay Sterling cover of It Ain’t Me by Selena Gomez and Kygo for her canter, and Love Yourself by Justin Beiber for her walk. “I chose music that was easy to ride to and upbeat to match her elevated gaits,” said Speck-Kern, who trains out of her Loxahatchee facility with Olympian Ali Brock. “We decided to do the Freestyle as a step towards the winter CDIs next season; I’ve never done a CDI and wanted to practice with her in the summer when there was less pressure. She’s really been stepping up in her training, and our lessons with Ali [Brock] have been going really well. We are preparing her for the Grand Prix, but are very much taking our time and letting Zenanta determine when we are ready. There’s no rush, and the emphasis will be on quality. For now my plans are to show our I1 freestyle one more time this summer, then maybe go to regionals with an eye on nationals before seeing where our training is for the beginning of the 2019 season.”

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Speck-Kern and Zenanta in a May training session with Ali Brock

AliBrockZ

Speck-Kern closed out her 2018 winter season with successful rides on her two campaign horses, Zenanta and Amadeus (Flemmingh x Welt Hit II). A and Z, as they are known around the barn, put in solid tests at the national level during the 2018 Adequan Global Dressage Festival. Zenanta began by making her Intermediare I debut just before the start of season and closing AGDF Week 12 with a personal high score at the level; she and Speck-Kern also won the Intermediare I during the Palm Beach Dressage Derby with a score of 66%. Amadeus, a gelding Speck-Kern scouted and imported from Europe as a 3-year-old, is making currently competing at Intermediare and making steady progress towards the Grand Prix.

Excel Dressage was founded by Speck-Kern in 2010 and offers training, showing, and sales of top caliber dressage horses in Loxahatchee, Florida, just minutes from Wellington’s equestrian center. After beginning her career with Olympic Bronze Medalist Michael Poulin and “S” Judge Sharon Poulin, Speck-Kern’s naturally quiet and effective riding style and training methods drew a strong client base of competitive amateurs. A successful FEI competitor, Speck-Kern was ranked top in the nation at the 2016 Markel/USEF National Young Horse Championships aboard the Kathryn Hoog’s KWPN mare Gerona, and has developed a base of international adult amateurs that compete through the FEI level. Excel Dressage imports a select number of exceptional sales and show prospects each year, and Speck-Kern is also an equestrian Ambassador for the Kids Cancer Foundation as a way to give back to the research and therapies that saved her life when she was diagnosed with Acute Myleoid Leukemia at 18. With her sights set on eventually obtaining an international judges license, she will next pursue her ‘R’ accreditation and continues to develop her string of competition horses.

Core Equine Disease Risks Increase Amid Mosquito Season

Horses are threatened with mortality rates up to 90 percent from mosquito-transmitted diseases, which include Eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE), Western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE) and West Nile virus.1

 

Horses are at the highest risk for contracting these diseases during mosquito season, occurring summer through fall in the United States.2 Risk management is critical for horse owners.

 

“To help limit a horse’s risk of contracting deadly core equine diseases, annual vaccinations are immensely important,” said Jaci Boggs, DVM, senior technical services veterinarian at Zoetis.

 

Prioritizing annual vaccination is the most effective strategy for helping protect horses against mosquito-borne diseases. Vaccinated horses have shown to be 30 times less likely to contract West Nile virus.3West Nile-Innovator® is the veterinarian’s first choice for core disease protection against West Nile virus and equine encephalomyelitis due to Eastern, Western and Venezuelan viruses.4

 

“In conjunction with annual vaccination, proper management of the environment to limit mosquito breeding opportunities is critical,” Boggs said.

 

Try implementing these 5 barn-friendly mosquito management tips:

  • Remove objects such as unused troughs, wheelbarrows and tarps to eliminate mosquito-breeding habitats.
  • Empty and clean any water-holding containers on a weekly basis.
  • Fill in any low-lying areas that collect standing water after rainfall.
  • Hang fans throughout the barn where horses are stabled, as mosquitoes avoid moving air.
  • Apply insect repellent or bring horses inside from dusk to dawn, which are peak mosquito feeding hours.

 

“It’s important for horse owners to remember that West Nile virus cases continue to occur across the United States,” Boggs said. “An unvaccinated horse is very much at risk for core equine diseases, such as West Nile, EEE and WEE.”

 

All horses need annual core disease vaccination as the foundation of their wellness program. Contact your veterinarian today to discuss vaccinating amid an emerging mosquito population. Visit CoreEquineDiseases.com to learn more.

 

About Zoetis

Zoetis (NYSE: ZTS) is the leading animal health company, dedicated to supporting its customers and their businesses. Building on more than 60 years of experience in animal health, Zoetis discovers, develops, manufactures and markets veterinary vaccines and medicines, complemented by diagnostic products, genetic tests, biodevices and a range of services. Zoetis serves veterinarians, livestock producers and people who raise and care for farm and companion animals with sales of its products in more than 100 countries. In 2017, the company generated annual revenue of $5.3 billion with approximately 9,000 employees. For more information, visit www.zoetisUS.com.

 

 

 

1American Association of Equine Practitioners. Vaccination Guidelines. https://aaep.org/guidelines/vaccination-guidelines. Accessed June 1, 2018.

2 Center for Disease Control and Prevention. West Nile virus. https://www.cdc.gov/westnile/index.html. Accessed June 1, 2018.

3 Epp T, Waldner C, West K. Efficacy of vaccination for West Nile virus in Saskatchewan horses, in Proceedings. 51st Annual Convention of the American Association of Equine Practitioners 2005;180-182.

4 Data on file, MDI sales data for WEST NILE-INNOVATOR as of 12/31/16, Zoetis Inc.

 

All trademarks are the property of Zoetis Services LLC or a related company or a licensor unless otherwise noted.
© 2018 Zoetis Services LLC. All rights reserved. COR-00043

Four Directions Amino Acids Can Take – The Importance of Feeding Several Protein Sources

 

 

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D.  

 

The quantity of protein in the diet is important but even more so, is its quality. To achieve this, we need to include additional protein sources to a forage-based diet. It all has to do with the way the body digests and utilizes protein.

 

Hay provides protein, but it’s of poor quality

 

Its protein is digested down to individual amino acids. This process starts in the stomach and is completed in the small intestine. They are absorbed into the blood stream and travel to tissues within your horse’s body to be reassembled into long, branched chains of amino acids to create proteins that are specific to your horse’s needs. There are hundreds of proteins in the body, some of which include those in the muscles, joints, skin, and hooves, as well as digestive enzymes, antibodies, and some hormones.

 

Grasses and grass hays should offer the foundation of your horse’s diet. But their protein content is of poor quality. That means that while they do offer amino acids, including essential amino acids (those which the horse’s body cannot produce or produce in sufficient quantity), they are inadequate in number and proportion. So, when the amino acids from hay digestion reach a tissue, muscle for example, the muscle requires specific amino acids in the right number and proportion to build new muscle proteins.

 

Left over amino acids cannot be saved for later

 

With a poor-quality protein, there will be many amino acids left over because some key amino acids are not available in sufficient quantity to produce muscle protein, as in our example. The left over amino acids cannot be saved for later. Instead, they go to the liver where they are broken apart – a process known as “deamination.” The amino acid is divided into two components: ammonia (which later gets converted to urea and excreted in the urine**), and an organic acid. The organic acid portion can undergo biochemical changes in one of three directions:

 

  1. Converted to glucose. Most amino acids, once deaminated, can be converted to glucose. Glucose is the predominant blood sugar and is the necessary energy source for your horse’s nervous system, including his brain.

 

Once blood glucose rises, the pancreas responds by secreting insulin to get the glucose into many of his body’s tissues. This should raise a “red flag” for owners of insulin resistant horses, since it’s not just sugar and starch that raises blood glucose – excess amino acids can, as well. This will only occur, however, if the diet is low in carbohydrates. Forages are generally high enough but if you are restricting forage to help your horse lose weight, he will need to get glucose from somewhere. He will likely lose muscle mass, since muscle offers a large amount of available amino acids, which can be deaminated and converted to glucose (through a process known as gluconeogenesis). In addition to muscle loss, he will utilize what protein he has in his diet to also offer glucose to keep his nervous system functioning.

 

  1. Burned for energy. If your horse’s diet is low in calories (referred to as “digestible energy” on your hay analysis report), he will use protein, as well as carbohydrates and fats, to meet his energy needs. Carbohydrates (sugars, starch, and digestible fibers), as well as fats are supposed to be used for energy. But protein is not; it’s supposed to be used for body protein synthesis. If your horse is not getting enough carbohydrates and fat in the diet, the dietary protein will be “wasted,” burned for energy, and not used for its intended function.

 

  1. Converted to fat. Now isn’t that ironic? If you are feeding a low starch/low sugar hay to help your horse lose weight, and this is the only source of protein, that protein could actually be converted to body fat! This would only happen, of course, if the glucose and caloric needs have already been met. But feeding an appropriately low sugar/low starch hay, free-choice, without any additional source of protein (amino acids), could make your horse get fatter.

 

The solution is not reducing forage. That would only make the amino acids be used for energy, for glucose (raises insulin), or encourage muscle loss. The solution is to provide enough quality protein so that the fourth and desirable outcome occurs: amino acids from hay digestion can be kept intact, not deaminated.

 

Add a different protein source

 

When amino acids are kept whole and not destroyed in the liver, they can be “strung” together in specific patterns to produce the protein needed within the body. The best way to ensure this is to add another protein source that has a different amino acid profile. That way, it can enhance the amino acid pool diversity. Hence, more amino acids are available for your horse’s health maintenance and repair.

 

An analogy would be making a beaded necklace where every fourth bead is red. You buy a bag of beads and there are some red ones, but you find that you cannot make a necklace at the length you’d like it because the bag does not have enough red ones (like feeding poor-quality protein such as only hay). So, you go out and buy a different bag of beads with lots of red ones (another protein source). Now you have enough red ones to make a necklace, and maybe even more than one necklace.

 

The amino acid variety is far more important than the protein percentage

 

If your hay is high in protein, but it is the only source of protein, many amino acids will be destroyed. To reduce this, you’ll want to start by feeding a variety of grasses, not just one type of grass hay. Adding alfalfa will also help. But a preferable approach is to offer a small amount of non-grass feedstuffs such as ground flaxseeds, chia seeds, hemp seeds, and other whole foods. This results in an assorted group of amino acids, sufficient to meet your horse’s needs.

 

Bottom line

 

To offer your horse the amino acid building blocks he needs to build and repair body proteins, it is important that the diet contain a variety of protein sources to maintain an adequate amino acid pool. If this pool is missing too many specific amino acids, many will ultimately be deaminated in the liver, rendering them unusable for body protein production. Instead, they can be burned for energy, converted to glucose, and even stored as fat. Adding a small amount of protein-rich whole foods increases the number of intact amino acids, helping your horse remain strong and healthy.

 

** If your horse’s urine seems particularly strong-smelling, don’t necessarily assume that it is because he is getting too much protein. It could be because his protein intake is of poor quality, causing deamination of unused amino acids. Improving the protein quality will reduce urea content in the urine.

 

 

Permission to reprint this article is granted, provided attribution is given to Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. No editorial changes may be made without her permission. Dr. Getty appreciates being notified of any publication.

 

Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. is an independent equine nutritionist with a wide U.S. and international following. Her research-based approach optimizes equine health by aligning physiology and instincts with correct feeding and nutrition practices. Dr. Getty’s goal is to empower the horseperson with the confidence and knowledge to provide the best nutrition for his or her horse’s needs.

 

Dr. Getty’s fundamental resource book, Feed Your Horse Like a Horse, is available in paperback as well as in hardcover and Kindle versions. All except the Kindle version are available at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com— buy the book there and have it inscribed by the author. Print and Kindle versions are also available at Amazon (www.Amazon.com); find print versions at other online retail bookstores. The seven individual volumes in Dr. Getty’s topic-centered “Spotlight on Equine Nutrition” series are available with special package pricing at her website, and also at Amazon in print and Kindle versions. Dr. Getty’s books make ideal gifts for equestrians!

 

Find a world of useful information for the horseperson at www.GettyEquineNutrition.com: Sign up for Dr. Getty’s informative, free e-newsletter, Forage for Thought; browse her library of reference articles; search her nutrition forum archives; and purchase recordings of her educational teleseminars and interviews.

US Equestrian Names the Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team for FEI Dressage Nations Cup, Germany!

US Equestrian Names The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team for FEI Dressage Nations Cup™ Germany

From the US Equestrian Communications Department
Lexington, Ky. -US Equestrian has named four athlete-and-horse combinations for the FEI Dressage Nations Cup Germany and four combinations for the CDI4* at the World Equestrian Festival CHIO Aachen, July 17-22, 2018.

The Nations Cup CDIO5* and CDI4* will serve as a designated observation event for determining the 2018 The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team for the FEI World Equestrian Games™ (WEG) Tryon 2018, which will take place Sept. 11-23 in Mill Spring, N.C. An additional observation event will take place at Leudelange CDI4*, July 3-8.

The following WEG short-listed athletes and horses will compose The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team in the Nations Cup (in alphabetical order):

Laura Graves (Geneva, Fla.) and Verdades, a 16-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding she owns with Curt Maes

Adrienne Lyle (Ketchum, Idaho) and Salvino, Betsy Juliano LLC’s 11-year-old Hanoverian stallion

Kasey Perry-Glass (Wellington, Fla.) and Goerklintgaards Dublet, Diane Perry’s 15-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding

Steffen Peters (San Diego, Calif.) and Rosamunde, Four Winds Farm’s 11-year-old Rheinlander mare

The following WEG short-listed athletes and horses will compete in the CDI4* big tour (in alphabetical order):

Shelly Francis (Loxahatchee, Fla.) and Danilo, Patricia Stempel’s 14-year-old Hanoverian gelding

Ashley Holzer (New York, N.Y.) and Havanna 145, Diane Fellows’s 11-year-old Hanoverian mare

Olivia LaGoy-Weltz (Haymarket, Va.) and Lonoir, the 14-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding she owns with Mary Anne McPhail

Steffen Peters and Suppenkasper, Four Winds Farm’s 10-year-old KWPN gelding

Information regarding The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team’s selection procedures for the 2018 WEG can be found here and a list of the designated observation events can be found here.

The U.S. will also be represented at CHIO Aachen by the Land Rover U.S. Eventing Team

in the FEI Eventing Nations Cup™ CICO3* Aachen from July 19-21 and the NetJets® U.S. Show Jumping Team in the FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ CSIO5* Aachen on Thursday, July 19.

Find out more about the World Equestrian Festival CHIO Aachen.

The USEF International High Performance Programs are generously supported by the USET Foundation, USOC, and USEF Sponsors and Members.

The Importance of Vitamin E and Selenium

 

Vitamin E and selenium are powerful protectors of muscle as well as immune function.

Vitamin E and selenium (Se) are familiar nutrients to most horse people.  They are among the most common deficiencies in unsupplemented animals – and also the only two where deficiency diseases are still routinely seen.  Suboptimal levels also impact health and performance, and levels below those will trigger full blown deficiency syndromes.

E and Se are often supplemented together, but contrary to popular belief they do not actually work together, nor is their absorption from the intestinal tract interrelated in any way. However, they complement each other to provide broad spectrum protection to the body’s cells.

E and Se are both important antioxidants. Vitamin E works to prevent fats within membranes from oxidative damage.  Se, as part of the glutathione peroxidase enzymes, works to protect the internal watery portions of cells from free radical injury. Free radicals are a by-product of immune system activity, and of cells generating energy for work or cell division.

Vitamin E and selenium status is documented to significantly impact:

  • The nervous system
  • Muscular function
  • Fertility/sperm quality
  • Antibody levels in colostrum
  • Immune function
  • Red blood cell integrity in exercising horses
  • Heart health
  • Cancer surveillance

 

Selenium is also integral to the enzyme which converts the inactive form of thyroid hormone (T4) to the active T3.

 

In most areas of the US and Canada, selenium is barely adequate to frankly deficient.  Horses not being maintained on pasture have extremely low levels of vitamin E in unsupplemented diets. Vitamin E added to feeds or multi-ingredient supplements often acts more like a natural preservative than a supplement because even stabilized forms of the vitamin can breakdown easily.

Horses absorb inorganic selenium (e.g. sodium selenate) well, but absorption of this form may be reduced by high levels of competing minerals in the diet. For this reason, some or all of the selenium supplement should be in the form of high selenium yeast.

 

As above, vitamin E can be unstable. I prefer to supplement it separately. Because this is a fat-soluble vitamin it is best given dissolved in fat.  If your supplement is powdered, mix it into some oil or sprinkle it on top of oil top dressed on the feed.

 

Vitamin E and selenium are two of the most important and the most often deficient nutrients in the horse’s diet.  Make sure your horse’s intake is adequate.
Uckele Health & Nutrition, maker of CocoSoya®, offers Vitamin E and Selenium formulas. 

 

E-Se 10X provides concentrated natural Vitamin E and organic Selenium Yeast.  When combined, these two important antioxidants work synergistically to more powerfully support a healthy immune system, protect the cells and tissues of the horse’s body, and neutralize the damaging effects of excessive oxidative stress and free radicals.

Liquid E-50 provides high strength liquid Vitamin E that protects from damaging free radicals that can weaken cells and tissues.  In addition to powerful antioxidant properties, Vitamin E promotes healthy immune, cardiovascular, circulatory, neuromuscular, and reproductive functions.

Selenium Yeast Blend is an 0rganic chelated Selenium yeast blend in a palatable Brewer’s Yeast base. Commonly deficient in horses, Selenium supports muscle tissue, the heart, and the nervous system.  It also promotes a healthy immune system by neutralizing the damaging effects of excessive oxidative stress and free radicals.  Perfect for feeding Selenium without adding Vitamin E.

 

About Dr. Kellon
Dr. Eleanor Kellon, staff veterinary specialist for Uckele Health & Nutrition, is an established authority in the field of equine nutrition for over 30 years, and a founding member and leader of the Equine Cushings and Insulin Resistance (ECIR) group, whose mission is to improve the welfare of horses with metabolic disorders via integration of research and real-life clinical experience.  Prevention of laminitis is the ultimate goal.  www.ecirhorse.org

Uckele Health & Nutrition, maker of CocoSoya, is an innovation-driven health company committed to making people and their animals healthier.  On the leading edge of nutritional science and technology for over 50 years, Uckele formulates and manufactures a full spectrum of quality nutritional supplements incorporating the latest nutritional advances.  www.uckele.com.

 

The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team Rides to Bronze at the FEI Dressage Nations Cup™ The Netherlands

by US Equestrian Communications Department | Jun 23, 2018, 9:09 PM EST

Lexington, Ky. – The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team brings home bronze at the FEI Dressage Nations Cup™ The Netherlands at CHIO Rotterdam. Led by Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover, the team comprised of Olivia LaGoy-Weltz, Adrienne Lyle, Kasey Perry-Glass, and Steffen Peters delivered solid performances in the team’s first European Nations Cup of the season.

Sitting in third after the CDIO5* with a few points separating them from the leading teams of the Netherlands and Sweden, Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover was pleased with their continuing performances in the CDIO5* Grand Prix Special and Freestyle.

Setting the tone for the U.S., LaGoy-Weltz (Haymarket, Va.), with her own and Mary Anne McPhail’s14-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding Lonoir, were the first U.S. combination to enter the ring in the Grand Prix. The pair moved onto the Grand Prix Special where they finished with a 71.213 percent.

Peters (San Diego, Calif.), riding Four Winds Farm’s 11-year-old Rheinlander mare Rosamunde, led the team after the Grand Prix finishing on an impressive score of 74.130 percent, advancing them as the anchor combination to ride in the Grand Prix Freestyle where they finished third with a score of 77.135 percent.

Lyle (Ketchum, Idaho) and Salvino, Betsy Juliano LLC’s 11-year-old Hanoverian stallion, were hot on the heels of Peters’s Grand Prix score with a 73.913 percent. Prior to the start of the Grand Prix Special, Salvino’s noseband broke, but quick thinking from the U.S. teammates allowed the pair to fix it and get down centerline. Lyle and Salvino’s performance in the Grand Prix Special earned them a final score of 71.915 percent.

Perry-Glass (Wellington, Fla.) piloted Goerklintgaards Dublet, the 15-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding owned by Diane Perry, to wrap up the Grand Prix in style, confirming a third top-ten U.S. placement with a score of 73.065 percent. Perry-Glass and Dublet shined in the Grand Prix Freestyle for a final placement of 77.060 percent.

Based on the best three placings from the Grand Prix, the best three placings from the Grand Prix Special and the Grand Prix Freestyle, the Netherlands came in first with a score of 20 points, followed by Sweden in second with a score of 21 points and the United States in third with a score of 30 points.

“A year ago, the United States won the Nations Cup in Rotterdam with great riding on super horses and some good luck that day. This week we did not have the same luck going our way; however, the thing I will remember forever, besides our superb riders and horses, is the moment when Adrienne Lyle had the misfortune of having Salvino’s noseband snap for no apparent reason,” Chef d’Equipe Dover explained. “Her teammates, all of whom are actually still competing against her for one of four cherished spots on our World Championship Team, ran to help her take off the failed noseband and in record time, only rivaled by pit crews at NASCAR events, placed a new noseband on Salvino and allowed Adrienne to go on to masterfully ride the stallion to well over 71%! It is because of times like this that I am reminded why I am so proud to be the chef d’equipe of the fabulous U.S. team!”

In the CDI3*,  the relatively new partnership of Peters and Suppenkasper, Four Winds Farm’s 10-year-old KWPN gelding, had a successful outing in the international arena earning a top-three placing in the CDI3* Grand Prix with a score of 72.630 percent and earning a 74.210 percent in the CDI3* Grand Prix Freestyle.

Fellow U.S. competitors in the CDI3* shared in the success as Lyle piloted Horizon, Betsy Juliano LLC’s 11-year-old Oldenburg mare, to top marks in the Grand Prix Special with a score of 70.681percent. Followed by Shelly Francis (Loxahatchee, Fla.) and Danilo, Patricia Stempel’s 14-year-old Hanoverian gelding, earned a 70.426 percent with Ashley Holzer (New York, N.Y.) and Havanna 145, Diane Fellows’s 11-year-old Hanoverian mare, producing clean and consistent tests in the Grand Prix and Grand Prix Freestyle.

In the their first European competition in the CDI-U25, part of their Discover Dressage™ USEF/USDF Emerging Athlete Program membership, consistency was key as Natalie Pai (Wellington, Fla.) and Unlimited, Melanie Pai’s 17-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding, continued their impressive season as the highest-placed American with a score of 66.487 percent in the Grand Prix and a 67.500 percent in the Freestyle. Kerrigan Gluch (Wellington, Fla.) and Bolero CXLVIII, Hampton Green Farm’s 14-year-old P.R.E. stallion, proved to have an equally positive first European outing, earning a 65.256 percent in the Grand Prix and 67.275 percent in the Freestyle.

Find out more about CHIO Rotterdam and view results.

The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team Ready for FEI Dressage Nations Cup™ The Netherlands

 

Individuals Set for the CDI3* and CDI-U25 at CHIO Rotterdam

by Kathleen Landwehr, US Equestrian Communications Department | Jun 20, 2018, 5:02 PM EST

Lexington, Ky. – The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team aims for a top placing in the FEI Dressage Nations Cup The Netherlands, the team’s first European Nations Cup of the season. Chef d’Equipe Robert Dover will lead the team of Olivia LaGoy-Weltz and Lonoir, Adrienne Lyle and Salvino, Kasey Perry-Glass and Goerklintgaards Dublet, and Steffen Peters and Rosamunde at CHIO Rotterdam, June 21-23. The team combinations, along with individual U.S. competitors Shelly Francis and Danilo, Ashley Holzer and Havanna 145, and Peters and Suppenkasper, hope for impressive performances in the first of three designated observation events to determine The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team for the FEI World Equestrian Games™ (WEG) Tryon 2018. The WEG hopefuls are joined by two rising stars competing in their first European CDI-U25 as part of their Discover Dressage™ USEF/USDF Emerging Athlete Program membership, Kerrigan Gluch and Natalie Pai.

Meet the Team

Olivia LaGoy-Weltz
(Taylor Pence/US Equestrian)

Olivia LaGoy-Weltz from Haymarket, Va., riding Lonoir, the 14-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding she owns with Mary Anne McPhail. Follow LaGoy-Weltz on Facebook (@LivDressage), Twitter (@LivDressage), and Instagram (@livdressage).

 

 

Adrienne Lyle
(Taylor Pence/ US Equestrian)

Adrienne Lyle from Ketchum, Idaho, riding Salvino, Betsy Juliano LLC’s 11-year-old Hanoverian stallion. Follow Lyle on Facebook (@adriennelyleUSA), Twitter (@adriennelyle1), and Instagram (@adrienne.lyle).

 

 

Kasey Perry-Glass
(© Elena Lusenti)

Kasey Perry-Glass from Wellington, Fla., riding Goerklintgaards Dublet, Diane Perry’s 15-year-old Danish Warmblood gelding. Follow Perry-Glass on Facebook (@KaseyPerryDressage), Twitter (@KaseyPDressage), and Instagram (@kasey_perryglass).

 

 

Steffen Peters
(© Elena Lusenti)

Steffen Peters from San Diego, Calif., riding Rosamunde, Four Winds Farm’s 11-year-old Rheinlander mare. Follow Peters on Facebook (@arroyodelmar).

 

Last Time Out

The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team won gold in the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam.

LaGoy-Weltz and Lonoir were members of the gold-medal team at the 2018 FEI Dressage Nations Cup USA during week 12 of the Adequan® Global Dressage Festival (AGDF). They also won the FEI Grand Prix CDI4* and FEI Grand Prix Freestyle CDI4* during week 10 of the AGDF.

Lyle and Salvino were members of the gold-medal team at the 2018 FEI Dressage Nations Cup USA and won the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle CDIO3* during week 12 of the AGDF.

Perry-Glass and Goerklintgaards Dublet won the FEI Grand Prix CDI3* and FEI Grand Prix Special CDI3* at the 2018 WEG Dressage Test Event.

Peters and Rosamunde won the FEI Grand Prix CDI-W and finished second in the FEI Grand Prix Special CDI-W at the 2018 Del Mar National Horse Show.

 

Career Highlights

LaGoy-Weltz: Team gold in the 2018 FEI Dressage Nations Cup USA, the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam, and the 2015 FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Wellington; team silver in the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Aachen and the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Wellington

Lyle: Normandy 2014 WEG team member; London 2012 Olympian; team gold in the 2018 FEI Dressage Nations Cup USA and the 2014 FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Wellington; team silver 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Aachen

Perry-Glass: Team bronze in the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympic Games; 2017 FEI World Cup™ Dressage Final competitor; team gold in the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam and the 2016 FEI Nations Cup CDIO3* Wellington; team silver in the 2017 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Aachen and the 2016 FEI Nations Cup CDIO5* Rotterdam

Peters: Team and individual gold at the Toronto 2015 Pan American Games and the Guadalajara 2011 Pan American Games; team bronze at the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Olympic Games and the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games and a four-time Olympian (1996, 2008, 2012, 2016); team bronze at the Aachen 2006 WEG and two individual bronze medals at the Lexington 2010 WEG; 2009 FEI World Cup Dressage Final Champion and five-time competitor (2002, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2017); and numerous FEI Nations Cup medals

 

The U.S. dressage contingent at CHIO Rotterdam (Shannon Brinkman Photo)

Meet the WEG Short-Listed CDI3* Competitors

Shelly Francis (Loxahatchee, Fla.) and Danilo, Patricia Stempel’s 14-year-old Hanoverian gelding, earned numerous top-three finishes at the AGDF to begin 2018. They then headed to the 2018 FEI World Cup Dressage Final in Paris, France, finishing 12th in the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle. Most recently, Francis and Danilo won the FEI Grand Prix and FEI Grand Prix Special at CDI3* Aachen.

Ashley Holzer (New York, N.Y.) and Havanna 145, Diane Fellows’s 11-year-old Hanoverian mare, finished in the top eight several times at the AGDF earlier this year. They aided The Dutta Corp. U.S. Dressage Team in winning gold at the FEI Dressage Nations Cup USA before finishing fifth in the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle.

Peters and Suppenkasper, Four Winds Farm’s 10-year-old KWPN gelding, are a new combination, but they have won at almost every turn in 2018. The pair racked up four wins at the Adequan West Coast Dressage Festival. At the end of April, Peters and Suppenkasper won the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle CDI-W and finished third in the FEI Grand Prix CDI-W at the Del Mar National Horse Show.

Additionally, Lyle and Horizon, Betsy Juliano LLC’s 11-year-old Oldenburg mare, will also compete in the CDI3*.

 

Meet the CDI-U25 Competitors

Kerrigan Gluch (Wellington, Fla.) and Bolero CXLVIII, Hampton Green Farm’s 14-year-old P.R.E. stallion, had a solid start to their season with top placings at the AGDF. They won the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle 16-25 CDI-U25 during week seven of AGDF. Gluch and Bolero CXLVIII then helped the U.S. team win silver in the CDIO-U25 during week 12.

Natalie Pai (Wellington, Fla.) and Unlimited, Melanie Pai’s 17-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding, also had impressive showings at the AGDF. They won the FEI Intermediate II 16-25 CDI-U25 and the FEI Grand Prix Freestyle 16-25 CDI-U25 during week 10, followed by the team silver medal in the CDIO-U25 two weeks later.

 

Competition Information

Competition will begin with the CDIO5* Grand Prix at 5:00 a.m. ET on Thursday, June 21.

Watch the live stream of the FEI Dressage Nations Cup The Netherlands on USA Dressage Facebook.

Competition Schedule

Live Scoring

Find out more information about CHIO Rotterdam.

The U.S. will also be represented at CHIO Rotterdam by the NetJets® U.S. Show Jumping Team in the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ The Netherlands, June 24.